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Carla Insinga has been with AFSCME for over two decades and took up the reins as Director of District Council 90 in 2017, after working as the Education Director.

“We know that when people don’t have enough to eat and don’t have safety at the workplace — whether they’re a mine worker, a steelworker, a farmworker, or a fast-food worker, it becomes a moral iss

We are truly all in this together. We work collectively, we bargain collectively, and we vote collectively for a reason. We are stronger as a union.

Anne Kurtek has been a proud union member for over 40 years, starting her career with Oil Chemical and Atomic Workers (OCAW), and has been organizing workers ever since. As of 2001, she has served as President of the Schuylkill County Central Labor Council (CLC) and is now a member of USW Local 719. Prior to that, she was the Recording Secretary for nearly a decade and a member of the Committee of Minority Affairs.

 

One way to view President Donald Trump’s executive actions last week on COVID relief is that they represent unlawful overreach. But that would imply that while his actions are illegal, they are nevertheless effective — and therein lies the core problem. What our showman president signed last week was nothing more than smoke and mirrors. 

In March, working families across the country started to scramble. Our homes were transformed into makeshift classrooms, summer camps and daycare centers as the COVID-19 pandemic shuttered schools and child care facilities.

In May, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the HEROES Act, a piece of legislation that would provide much-needed solutions to our current economic and public safety crisis. Unfortunately, its path forward has been uncertain. There has been no debate on the bill in the Senate, and Mitch McConnell even sent the Senate on vacation without hearing it.

More than three years after taking office, the administration has never filled the job running the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, which is charged with enforcing workplace safety laws. The $560 million-a-year agency, whose estimated 2,000 inspectors performed 32,020 on-site inspections in 2018, spent months not doing any in-person inspections related to coronavirus, other than in hospitals, said Rebecca Reindel, director of occupational safety and health for the AFL-CIO.

Working people are bearing the brunt of this global pandemic and economic crisis. The physical toll, death, pain, and suffering that Oregon’s frontline and essential workers have experienced is unprecedented.

Coupled with the economic collapse that has exacerbated long-term inequities for low wage workers and BIPOC communities, workers are hurting and they need protections.